Decision Making

Introduction

In life we all have decisions to make. Statistics say that we make about 35,000 decisions a day. Most of those 35,000 are very small choices that we make every day like, brushing our teeth, what we wear, to get on the freeway or take surface streets, and what we eat.The decisions are more or less made subconsciously. Other decision are bigger. These bigger decisions take a lot more effort to make. Decisions like, buying a car or house, marriage, what job to get, or having children.

What I’ve been teaching

I’ve been teaching the skill of decision making in my health classes the last couple of weeks. As I’ve been teaching this unit I’ve come to realize that I have been making a lot of big decisions over the last year and a half. I wonder how I came to learn about decision making. Did I learn it in school or from my parents? Either way I’m grateful for learning that skill.

I use the content of of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs to teach decision making. There are two main resources I use in my classes. I use Lesson Planning for Skills-Based Health Education by Benes and Alperin and the Project School Wellness website.

One thing I like to teach my students is the acronym D.E.C.I.D.E

D – Define the decision

E – Explore your options

C – Consider your consequences (good and bad)

I – Identify your values

D – Decide and act

E – Evaluate the results (reflect on decision)

*from projectschoolwellness.com

Over the course of the unit we hear different parts of one continuous story of a fictional party. Students decide whether or not to go to this party. As we learn more details it is interesting to see how many students end up changing their decision.

Not only do we hear the story during this unit, but we discover what our values are and the 8 Ethical Tests. These tools really change students perspective on making a health-enhancing decision. A lot of growth can really happen in just a short amount of time.

I think something that really hits home, and I encourage you to do the same is giving real life examples from your life. Teachers who can speak from personal experience can gain a lot of trust in the students they teach. If trust can be made positive influence can be made.

Doing what I teach

As I’m writing this I feel that I’ve been trying to make a decision that may not be for me. I keep trying and trying to move into administration. Unfortunately, I keep getting turned down. After taking some time to reflect and using the tools that I teach and prayer, I’ve come to the decision that administration may not be what I’ve been cut out to do.

For now, I need to stick to my strengths. I’m going to focus more on providing more content at thephysedcoach.com, Twitter, and Youtube. I’m also trying to build a team in Mid-Missouri to provide professional development at the local, regional, and state level; think of H-PEC out in California founded by Terri Drain.

I’ve decided to be an influence right where I’m at and be happy and grateful for where God has me.

What about you?

Are there decisions you need to make? How do you make them? I challenge you to take time, weigh out the pros and cons of all of the big decisions that you make. Consider your values and ask yourself the 8 Ethical Tests.

Be the person and the teacher that sets the example for your family and your students. Health-enhancing decisions will lead to a more fulfilled life.

Conclusion

I’m always here to help. You can contact me on Twitter @mrphysicaled or you can email me at eric@thephysed coach.com.

Make the decision to be the best version of you!

This microblog post was a featured post in #slowchathealth’s #microblogmonth event. You can search for all of the featured posts here. Please do follow each of the outstanding contributors on social media (including Eric Davolt, the author of this post) and consider writing a microblog post of your own to be shared with the global audience of slowchathealth.com

Pair this post with the following:

A Poem About Stories by Amy Dawson

Behavior Change is Complex by Marcia Berke

More Movement in the Classroom by Andy Milne

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